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Gene Fulton's "Bad Attitude" - A 5 second, Wheel Standing, 41 Willys Coupe Gasser

 

 

Gene Fulton has won 14 IHRA national events. He’s a five-time IHRA Modified Eliminator

champion, built the first ever 5-second Pro Mod nitrous motor, barrel-rolled a 1964

Chevy II wagon and then buried it behind his shop, and has his name next to Don Garlits

over the grandstands at Bristol Dragway.  When a man with his credentials decides to

build a gasser over lunch, you better believe it’s going to be just a little out of the ordinary.


“You want the car to look period correct,” Gene says, “but you also have to consider the

safety aspect. You want a good, reliable car capable of making runs. You have to walk a

fine line between control and chaos. You want a car that will do great burnouts, pull the

wheels in the air at launch, and run fast too.”

 

 

Gene hasn’t given the car the full go on a quarter-mile, but he has made some 5-second

eighth-mile passes at Shadyside Dragway in Shelby, North Carolina, hence it does great

burnouts and pulls the wheels.  Fulton runs a small-block Chevy with 16.5:1 compression

and a roller cam with 0.925 lift, and 283/295 duration at 0.050 fed by eight 160-cfm

Edelbrock 94s on a sectioned, shortened, and reworked Edelbrock 23-degree manifold. 

Ported aluminum heads are disguised as 300-horse iron double hump heads.  

Fulton ground the front of the heads smooth and welded the distinctive camelback shape

on the modern pieces to give them a vintage feel.   Decidedly less vintage is 1,500 pounds

of spring pressure on valve springs slamming open titanium valves.   Inside the 421ci

Dart block, is a Callies crank & rods, and Diamond pistons producing 905 hp at 8,500 rpm.



 

This motor definitely has an "old school look" with eight carbs and steel valve covers!

 

 

The fun started immediately with a snowy winter drive to Scott Rods and Custom Fiberglass in Ohio to pick up the 1941 Willys body. Many late nights followed in Gene’s shop. They sketched out the frame on the floor, and began fabrication using cardboard templates and whichever parts and pieces arrived that week. In the morning they’d all head off to their real jobs. “I swear we were having as much fun as a bunch of high school kids,” Gene says. “It really was like back in the day when you’d have all your friends help build stuff.”

So while the car itself might be a mix of modern and nostalgic, the spirit behind it is about as period correct as you can get. Grab some talented friends, gather parts and pieces, and build something wild for the fun of it.



Read more: http://www.hotrod.com/cars/featured/1411-willys-wheelie-machine/#ixzz3Ixlkg39J
Follow us: @HotRodMagazine on Twitter | HotRodMag on Facebook
 
The fun started immediately with a snowy winter drive to Scott Rods and Custom Fiberglass in Ohio to pick up the 1941 Willys body. Many late nights followed in Gene’s shop. They sketched out the frame on the floor, and began fabrication using cardboard templates and whichever parts and pieces arrived that week. In the morning they’d all head off to their real jobs. “I swear we were having as much fun as a bunch of high school kids,” Gene says. “It really was like back in the day when you’d have all your friends help build stuff.”

So while the car itself might be a mix of modern and nostalgic, the spirit behind it is about as period correct as you can get. Grab some talented friends, gather parts and pieces, and build something wild for the fun of it.



Read more: http://www.hotrod.com/cars/featured/1411-willys-wheelie-machine/#ixzz3Ixlkg39J
Follow us: @HotRodMagazine on Twitter | HotRodMag on Facebook
 
The fun started immediately with a snowy winter drive to Scott Rods and Custom Fiberglass in Ohio to pick up the 1941 Willys body. Many late nights followed in Gene’s shop. They sketched out the frame on the floor, and began fabrication using cardboard templates and whichever parts and pieces arrived that week. In the morning they’d all head off to their real jobs. “I swear we were having as much fun as a bunch of high school kids,” Gene says. “It really was like back in the day when you’d have all your friends help build stuff.”

 



Read more: http://www.hotrod.com/cars/featured/1411-willys-wheelie-machine/#ixzz3IxlyYfRv
Follow us: @HotRodMagazine on Twitter | HotRodMag on Facebook
 

 

Lots of Strange Engineering parts under the Willys, including axles, third member, and

11-inch brakes. The ladder bars were built by Gene, and QA1 shocks and springs keep

the gasser from bouncing around on the track.

 

 

 

Inside the car you will find all the required safety features of a modern day race car.

 

 

 

A Hurst shifter pokes up from the street-sign trans tunnel. Underneath is a G-Force

four-speed with a Boninfante bell housing, clutch, and flywheel. Gene says it’s

durable and effortless to shift, “as long as you’re talented enough.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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